Covid, influenza, gastroenteritis: Nancy CHRU pediatric emergency care is saturated

For more than 15 days, Nancy CHRU’s pediatric ER was overcrowded. (©Pixabay/Illustration)

Covid-19, influenza, gastroenteritis… For more than two weeks now Emergency Pediatric Care from Nancy University Hospital saturated.

On social media, the establishment is also urging parents to use common sense.

“A catastrophic epidemic of gastroenteritis”

With the onset of good weather, the pediatric ambulance receives the first small victims of domestic accidents. Ann Borsa-Dorion, Pediatrician of the Director of the Pediatric Emergency Department of the University Hospital of Nancypoints to News of Lorraine “At the moment, we are receiving a lot of children who are injured on the street. It goes, for example, from a wound to a fracture.”

But that’s not all. In addition to these domestic incidents, the service has to deal with a “catastrophic epidemic of gastroenteritis.”

This year, gastroenteritis is especially violent. We welcome the children who have not been exposed to the virus a priori in recent years due to precautions related to Covid-19. As a result, we get very, very vulnerable children. Some need to be treated, hospitalized and injected. We have children who come after ten or fifteen vomits or stools within a few hours.

Ann Borsa-DorionPediatrician Head of the Pediatric Emergency Department at the University Hospital of Nancy

Problems in some children

According to the pediatrician, children hospitalized with gastroenteritis are at the maximum age of 6-7 years. “On top of that, we manage to find a balance,” she explains. But another problem arises: lack of oral rehydration solution.

You should be aware that a child can become dehydrated very quickly, particularly in less than 24 hours. And what we are not happy with at all right now is that there is not enough oral rehydration solution in the city and in the laboratories. A small sachet of powder to dilute with water. This is the equivalent of an infusion that helps stop vomiting.

Ann Borsa-DorionPediatrician Head of the Pediatric Emergency Department at the University Hospital of Nancy

Children affected by violent gastroenteritis may also have problems. “We have children who will be difficult to pick up. Someone will be afraid to eat, because now they associate food with vomiting, ”the pediatrician clarifies.

“A Pretty Dangerous Flu”

In addition to gastroenteritis, CHRU Nancy also has to deal with the flu, “highly contagious among children this year,” the head of pediatric emergency care emphasizes.

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As a result, we have really very feverish children. Babies do not tolerate fever well, tremble, curl up … Therefore, you need to be on your guard and not miss a possible meningitis. Not to mention observation, as some children may develop complications at the respiratory level as well as at the muscle level.

Ann Borsa-DorionPediatrician Head of the Pediatric Emergency Department at the University Hospital of Nancy

Covid-19 is also around the corner. After a significant fall, he is clearly coming back.

Some children have the flu, but also Covid-19. However, in addition to severe forms, in the case of Covid, only infants under the age of 3 months can be hospitalized. Because we have to watch their diet and make sure they can handle the fever.

Ann Borsa-DorionPediatrician Head of the Pediatric Emergency Department at the University Hospital of Nancy

Unseen in Pediatrics

For all of these reasons, Ann Borsa-Dorion and, more broadly, Nancy’s CHRU are urging parents to “not bottle up pediatric emergencies with minor ulcers.”

We have older children who come in for sickness because they have a sore throat or a fever. If they can take paracetamol, there is no need to clog the emergency room. Take a step back and use common sense. Because you need to know that the bed is only free for a few minutes. We have little patients waiting on beds in the emergency room, sometimes until 6 or 8 am, before getting a room. This has never happened before in pediatrics!

Ann Borsa-DorionPediatrician Head of the Pediatric Emergency Department at the University Hospital of Nancy

Pediatric emergency services currently see between 100 and 130 children per day. Among them, 20 to 25 people must be hospitalized. A difficult situation for doctors, especially when 30 patients are waiting in one room. “We are afraid to miss something big in the waiting room, knowing that we already have to take care of hospitalized patients, even if the nurses know about the files upstream.”

Ann Borsa-Dorion, however, wants to clarify that “the goal is not to stop people from going to the emergency room. But sometimes it’s better to see a doctor or pediatrician or dial 15 before rushing to the hospital.

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