with “At the Same Time” Curwen and Delepin stick to that time

They have nothing in common, and therefore fate will bring them together. As with most comedies, the antagonistic duets hit the mark. But Gustave Quervin and Benoît Delepin are not Francis Weber or Philippe de Broca. Pranksters, yes, but with a burlesque feel that includes a social dimension. This does not protect against disruptions of inspiration or laziness of performance: “At the same time” is not always on top, it stalls …

They have nothing in common, and therefore fate will bring them together. As with most comedies, the antagonistic duets hit the mark. But Gustave Quervin and Benoît Delepin are not Francis Weber or Philippe de Broca. Pranksters, yes, but with a burlesque feel that includes a social dimension. This does not protect against disruptions of inspiration or laziness in performance: “At the same time” is not always on top, hobbles along the way and no longer has the fantasy of the first opuses, which does not prevent us from having fun. sometimes. Thanks, in particular, to the actors, who each come up with a character in their own way.

To each his own

Jonathan Cohen, the first, is a racist, homophobic, meat-eater, terrible but hilarious as Didier Beke, the right-wing mayor. Also, a misogynist who forgets that women who will steal their jobs from guys will be the perfect replacement. Beke single-handedly pulls together all the flaws of the worst white man imaginable, willing to sell his father and mother, in order to sell his eco-friendly colleague Pascal Molitor the idea of ​​a holiday park that only has a green name, as he will be responsible for the destruction of the virgin forest . He decided on all the lies to convince the chosen one to accept his project.

Then Vincent Macane as Molitor. Of the opposite temperament, a complete vegetarian, organic through and through, harmless, gentle as a lamb and, finally, so reasonable that it is not at all funny. His secretary does not hesitate to reproach him for this. He defends weakly: “I’m not funny because the world is not funny…” The one that Curwen and Delepin came up with at least has the merit of feeding reasons for joy by reflecting a society that has held its breath.

Learn to walk together

Connecting opposites. Now in the city, a gang of angry women in the style of Femen are engaged in spectacular actions. They use an intimidatingly effective glue, which not only sticks posters to walls and monuments, but also punishes people. Induce horror with glue: there is nothing worse than an object riveted to your fingers, as if blaming you.

After one of their interventions, Didier Beke and Pascal Molitor find themselves tied up, one’s penis taped to the other’s buttocks. A delicate, awkward, even cruel situation, denouncing in the eyes of everyone a humiliating baseness. Not to mention that the most basic movements are compromised. You must learn to walk together, united like the Siamese. The couple tries their best to disperse, wandering from the surgery room to the alternative care pharmacy, passing through the police station, but nothing helps. Beke and Molitor are doomed to show themselves in this form.

A fable that mildly denounces modern failings and examines the most unbearable excesses of our modernity.

What if, living together, forced to face the same situations and breathe the same air, we learned to recognize and love each other? Essentially, this is the moral of the fable that mildly denounces modern failings, blesses nature and love of trees while maintaining a derisive look, pokes fun at inclusive language, and addresses the most unbearable excesses of our modernity. Including what filmmakers have always watched with caution, the digital realm, the dehumanization of services, platforms and other streams that are slowly killing cinema.

Cause women

On the political side, we’re swimming in what the decade has spawned on the women’s side: activism, all the more vehement than not new, excesses mixed with benefits. “You are not evil, but you are deaf! claims one of the activists (India Hair). Curwen and Delepin defend the interests of women in their own way and are happy to burden men’s shoulders. They do it without pity, with that friendliness that eventually pervaded their cinema.

“Men, do you understand? You tell them that they are strong, strong in everything … ”says Yolanda Moreau as the owner of a seedy bar called the IMF, where the boys come to the slums. We are far from Apollo Bellac, where Jean Giroux advised his heroine to tell men that they are beautiful. Another era.

“At the Same Time” by Gustave Quervin and Benoît Delepin. With Hair of India, Vincent Macane, Jonathan Cohen, François Damien, Yolanda Moreau, Jenny Beth. Duration: … In theaters Wednesday, April 6th.

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